Event Information: Direct Metal Printing – How Additive Manufacturing Drives New Levels of Efficiencies Through Part Count Reduction

Learn about transformational productivity through metal additive manufacturing and Part Count Reduction (PCR). Change the way you think about designing parts and understand the potential for revolutionary new designs in aerospace, automotive, energy and manufacturing industries.

Experience how the integration of Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) software, advanced metal additive manufacturing, and thoroughly developed metal materials are revolutionizing metal parts design and production.

Learn how to improve production efficiency: (examples)

– Part Count reduction of 155:1 and production time reduction by 75%
– Assembly errors, checks and time reduced to zero
– 50% reduction in material volume and 60% increase in cost-effectiveness
– Reduced part weight of 20% with 20% improvement in performance

See customer use cases from the Center for Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Maryland, the European Space Agency, Havells Sylvania, and Airbus Defense and Space.

Learn from an expert: Patrick Dunne, VP, Advanced Application Development, 3D Systems
– Over 15 years of experience in additive manufacturing and advanced applications development and engineering with 3D Systems, Brontes Technologies, and BMW.

Register now and get a complimentary eBook! The Definitive Guide to Direct Metal Printing

Register here

Shapeways launches first in-house 3D printed jewellery brand Spring & Wonder

“With this simple software extension, we’re offering brands the opportunity to empower their customers to create truly one-of-a-kind products at affordable prices.”

18095-33-601.jpg3D printing online marketplace Shapeways has unveiled its first in-house product line, a fully customisable range of 3D printed jewellery called Spring & Wonder.

Customers can personalise the design and material of each piece from three collections, ‘Signature,’ ‘Celestial,’ and ‘Geometric’ in silver, 14K gold, 14K rose gold, brass and bronze. Pricing currently ranges from $45 USD to $350 USD.

Used as an ecommerce and on-demand manufacturing platform for thousands of small creative businesses, Shapeways’ tools allow simple 3D modelling experiences to be incorporated into users’ online shopping platforms. By coding in javascript and connecting to Shapeways’ software and systems, users can leverage interactive customisation and click-to-print services on their own sites.

Read more

3-D and the Global Supply Chain

Over the last 5 years, 3-D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has had a tremendous influence in our industry. It is considered the current and future of almost any conceivable form of fabrication.  Though this technology has been embraced by enthusiasts from small-time makers to international aerospace ventures, questions about its cost effectiveness are paramount to widespread adoption. Here’s why.

Costs of production for additive manufacturing fall into two categories: “well-structured” costs, such as labor, material, and machine costs, and “ill-structured” costs, which can include machine setup, inventory, and build failure.  Right now, most cost studies focus on well-structured costs, which comprise a significant portion of 3-D printing production and are cited by detractors as evidence of cost ineffectiveness. Unfortunately, these studies focus on the production of single parts and tend to overlook supply chain effects, thus failing to account for the significant cost benefits which are often concealed within inventory and supply chain considerations.

Read more

Changing Track: How GE and Wabtec’s transaction will impact 3D printing and railways

What happens when two financial juggernauts in the same industry combine? It seems we are about to find out. Just a few weeks ago, it was confirmed that Wabtec Corporation is entering a definitive agreement to merge with GE Transportation, a branch of General Electric Company. This major transaction will not only boost Wabtec into a Fortune 500, global transportation leader in rail equipment, software, and services, but it will significantly influence the direction of 3D printing with regard to the railway industry as well.

3D printing has cemented itself as a core component in the evolution of railway manufacturing and equipment over the last several years, with several agencies and companies investing research and development resources into exploring further applications for the technology. The Dubai Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) has integrated 3D printing technology as a cost-effective method of creating and developing parts for the train system, including the ticket gates, ticket vending machines, and even the railways themselves as well as other assets across the metro network. In 2013, rail freight operator Union Pacific (UP) began experimenting with 3D printing to create handheld automatic equipment identification (AEI) devices to ensure that rolling stock is properly tracked and assembled. UP has also implemented 3D printing processes to greatly accelerate their production cycles, with parts now able to be 3D printed within mere hours.

Read more

Manufacturing in 3D: It’s changing the rules and how you compete

Digital manufacturing is disrupting entire industry sectors, so be prepared to move quickly.

If you continue to see 3D manufacturing as theoretical, think again. It has been used to print everything from organs to custom footwear, and NASA even made a rocket engine injector from a 3D printer. However, most manufacturers haven’t looked at how they’ll incorporate digital manufacturing, much less begin to adopt it.

The push for personalized products, democratized innovation, rapid urbanization, changing demographics and sustainability are big trends that are changing our world, and the way work happens will dramatically change along with them. 3D manufacturing can help businesses navigate these trends by reducing time-to-market, improving inventory management, lowering logistics costs and increasing flexibility to meeting customer needs.

Recognizing its enormous potential, many public-private collaborations across Canada encourage 3D printing adoption in industries such as aerospace, automotive, consumer packaged goods, telecommunications and healthcare. This, along with the most recent PLANT Manufacturers’ Outlook report, sets digital manufacturing as a primary area for investment.

Read more

Metal 3D printing’s day is coming in automotive

The world is undergoing some radical transformations related to the concept of “motorized transport.” This term was once synonymous with the automobile and the internal combustion engine, along with the conventional infrastructure supporting this technology like asphalt roads, filling stations and repair shops.

However, new technologies are rapidly expanding this category to include a variety of experimental transport solutions like gas-electric hybrids, fully-electric autonomous cars, eBikes, hyperloop elevated trains, jetpacks and flying cars. Given these advancements, it’s difficult to predict which approach will best fulfill our need for personal transport. However, I can safely say that metal 3D printing will be an even bigger part of the solution than it is today.

Read more

Audi to use Stratasys 3D printing to accelerate design verification

The German automotive manufacturer, Audi, has integrated the Stratasys J750 3D printer into its design operations.

Audi is using the Stratasys J750 printer to produce parts for prototypes

The printer, the world’s only full-colour, multi-material 3D printer, has been adopted by Audi to innovate and accelerate its design process.

The firm has found that it is able to produce prototypes efficiently and effectively through additive manufacturing.

At its Pre-Series Centre in Ingolstadt, Germany, Audi has been able to reduce the prototyping time for its tail light covers by 50% since implementing the Stratasys printer, against methods such as moulding and milling.

“Design is one of the most important buying decisions for Audi customers, therefore it’s crucial we adhere to supreme quality standards during the design and concept phase of vehicle development,” explains Dr. Tim Spiering, Head of the Audi Plastics 3D Printing Centre.

Disruptive 3D printing forces companies to reconsider manufacturing

Manufacturers are missing the board perspective on 3D printing. They need to completely reconsider their manufacturing processes.

3D printing technology has been around for decades, mostly used for creating prototypes. Advances in the technology have allowed 3D printing to morph into additive manufacturing (AM). When making one-offs or spare parts, 3D printing becomes a simple alternative to machining or molded parts. However, everything changes when it comes to production manufacturing. AM becomes a disruptive technology when you can print a single assembly that was previously 15 separate parts.

3D Systems, additive manufacturing 3D printing, part count reduction, PCR“The vast majority of those working with 3D printing still don’t see it in a broad enough perspective. They take this component or part that they’ve made for years, and say, ‘What would it take to 3D print it?’ It takes more time and money, and so they say this doesn’t work for us,” Jack Heslin, president and VP of business development at 3DTechTalks and Lazarus3D, told Design News. “But they’re not redesigning their manufacturing to take advantage of 3D printing. If they do, they might find that what was 100 parts will be 10 parts or less. That will affect their time-to-market, their accounting, their cost, everything.”

Read more

How to scale up to serial 3D printing production

Efficient serial production – true additive manufacturing – is the real game changer. Four case studies demonstrate how scaling up to serial 3D printing production represents a huge opportunity for manufacturers.

Labman Automation use 3DP parts in their custom laboratory automation and robotics equipment.Yorkshire-based Labman Automation creates custom laboratory automation and robotics equipment; this fast-growing small business has been working with Materialise for three years to produce bespoke parts for its machines.

“Our job is to be creative and the design freedom of 3D printing gives us free rein to come up with interesting and novel solutions for our customers,” says Rob Hodgson, Inventor at Labman Automation.

Read more

3D Printing Case Example: On the highway to the comfort zone

Case Study: 3D Printing is on the Highway to the Comfort Zone-1The history of the Oberle shoe company began more than 150 years ago. In 1859, the great-great grandfather of Oberle’s current General Manager, Achim Oberle, opened a cobbler’s shop in Ettenheim that made shoes for customers in town and the surrounding areas. In 2006, the company began specializing in “Healthy Shoes.” And today, it’s recognized as a leader in the orthopedic footwear technology space. The company saves a lot of time and money by using the German RepRap X350pro 3D printer.

Oberle – Gesunde Schuhe is a specialty manufacturer that develops products for everything associated with legs, feet, and/or extremities. Behind its products is a highly technical process. The so-called 3D posture analysis (which involves 3D measurements of whole body posture), as well as the 3D walking analysis (which measures gait, body angles, and forces), have long been standard procedures for this company. To stay on the cutting edge of the industry, Oberle – Gesunde Schuhe must continuously employ state-of-the-art technologies as they become available.

Read more