What are the 3D Printing technologies for prototyping and production?

engineer looking into 3D Printer machineHow to leverage additive manufacturing to build better products

Architects don’t build without modelling. They create “blueprints,” produce renderings, and build 3D models. But while these planning tools may resemble the actual building in shape, there is no resemblance in size or materials. As a result, except in the case of manufactured or modular buildings, the finished product will be the first time that real building materials have come together in exactly that configuration. That is one of the reason that architecture tends to be conservative in its rate of change. Without real-world testing, big change is risky.

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The growing influence of 3D Printing on heat treatment

Additive manufacturing, which is more commonly recognized as three-dimensional (3D) printing, has rapidly advanced over the last several years to allow a wide variety of companies to quickly produce working prototypes according to the specific designs provided by the manufacturer. Aside from plastic being the primary 3D printing material, a number of other materials including metals, cements and even glass have been incorporated into 3D printed products. The relationship between 3D printing and heat treatment is equally beneficial, as the heat treatment of 3D printed projects has been shown to dramatically increase the strength and stiffness of certain 3D printed parts, whereas the 3D printing of heat treatment parts can be advantageous in the manufacturing process and subsequent properties of the 3D printed parts.  

Heat Treating 3D Printed Products

Since practically all 3D printed materials exhibit surfaces that are near net shaped, there is a zero tolerance for contamination on any surfaces, which thereby requires temperature control during this process to remain at 2° F. By combining heat treatment processes with 3D printing, manufacturers are able to directly thermocouple the pieces they are producing while also improving the specific characteristics of the product being produced.

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HP to drive supply chain and manufacturing transformations using 3D tech

HP has announced new agreements with industry leaders Jabil and Forecast 3D to drive the future of distributed design, manufacturing and digital supply chains leveraging the power 3D technology. 

As the global economy enters what many call the 4th Industrial Revolution, new technologies such as 3D printing are enabling an array of new business opportunities such as distributed design and manufacturing, supply chain services, and increasingly localised production.

“From multinational design engineering and manufacturing, to localised  production, industry leaders such as Jabil and Forecast 3D are  demonstrating 3D printing’s expanding role in the digital transformation of the $12trn global manufacturing economy,” said Stephen Nigro, President of 3D Printing, HP Inc.

HP has announced new agreements with industry leaders Jabil and Forecast 3D to drive the future of distributed design

“HP Multi Jet Fusion customers and partners represent critical links in a new value chain that’s rewriting the rules of design, production, and delivery, ultimately ushering in a new era of digital manufacturing.”

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The difference between: 3D printing and CNC machining

With today’s increase in complexity for engineered products and the need for faster production of these products, manufacturers are having to choose between technologies. This paper will discuss and compare two of the methods used to produce parts, while recognizing that each has its place, and can complement each other in the design and manufacturing workflow. Download this paper to learn about the differences between 3D Printing and CNC Machining and when to choose each technique.

The Difference Between: 3D Printing and CNC Machining

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The Difference Between: 3D Printing and CNC Machining

A useful reminder


With today’s increase in complexity for engineered products and the need for faster production of these products, manufacturers are having to choose between technologies. This paper will discuss and compare two of the methods used to produce parts, while recognizing that each has its place, and can complement each other in the design and manufacturing workflow. Download this paper to learn about the differences between 3D Printing and CNC Machining and when to choose each technique.

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HP accelerates digital transformation of manufacturing with high-volume 3D production and applications

Customers worldwide ramping up 3D printing installations;
More than 3 million Multi Jet Fusion parts produced in last year alone;
Breakthrough program to digitally reinvent HP product lifecycle

News highlights:                 

  • Industry-wide acceleration of 3D printing for production of end-use parts and large-scale prototyping
  • Forecast 3D, GoProto, Stern, and more increasing Multi Jet Fusion capacity to meet rising demand
  • Reinventing HP With Multi Jet Fusion program leverages 3D across HP’s product lifecycle

ST. LOUIS, April 09, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Today at the world’s largest 3D printing user event, the Additive Manufacturing Users Group (AMUG) conference, HP Inc. showcased new large-scale customer deployments and its own Reinventing HP With Multi Jet Fusion program as the industry accelerates its journey to full-scale 3D production.  According to Wohlers Report 2018, the production of functional parts, including functional prototyping, is now the industry’s leading additive manufacturing use-case and the demand for production-grade parts is expected to continue to grow exponentially.  As the market leader, shipping more plastic production 3D printers than any other company in the world[1], HP is delivering both unprecedented capabilities and economic advantages to its manufacturing customers, and also embracing its own technology to transform the design, production, and distribution of HP products worldwide.

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3D Printing: Seven products to finish the job

GEFERTEC GmbHFrom beginning to end, take a look at all the components of 3D printing to ensure you are making the best possible products safely, quickly, and not wasting materials in the process.

3D printing is taking over the industrial world and new printers are always a source of excitement. But, what seems to rarely be a source for that same excitement, is all the components that actually go into completing the job. We’re talking about hazardous material clean-up, recycling old materials, software to get that precise cut, and cost-effective technology, to name a few.

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Startup to make 3D-printed concrete homes for US$4,000

A non-profit partnership is raising money to 3D-print durable and affordable concrete homes in El Salvador, in an effort to offset the global housing crisis.

Each single-storey, 650 square-foot home costs US$4,000 to build using a concrete-extruding printing apparatus, which is programmed to create the foundation and walls of the structure. The printing plans leave room for windows and a non-concrete roof, and can be adjusted to make room for wiring and plumbing as well.

The whole thing is the brainchild of three Texas-based entrepreneurs, whose tech startup Icon aims to revolutionize sustainable home construction.

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3D-printed liquid structures pave the way for flexible electronics

3d printed liquidA 3D printer has been adapted by a team at the US Department of Energy’s Berkeley Lab to print 3D structures composed entirely of liquids.

The modified printer injects threads of water into silicone oil – sculpting tubes made of one liquid within another liquid.

The printer could be used to construct liquid electronics that power flexible, stretchable devices, the researchers said.

The scientists also foresee chemically tuning the tubes and flowing molecules through them, leading to new ways to separate molecules or precisely deliver nanoscale building blocks to under-construction compounds.

A 3D printed bridge gives new shape to large-scale manufacturing

In October of 2017, the first 3D printed bridge bore a group of hard-hat-wearing city officials on bicycles as they wobbled across a canal in the city of Gemert in the Netherlands.

Officials and locals celebrated the opening of the 26-foot (8 meters) bridge that connects two roads over a small water-filled canal, said Phys.org. This structure represents a milestone for 3D printing of large-scale objects.

Printing the bridge’s 800 layers took about three months. The designers say the reinforced, pre-stressed concrete can handle loads equivalent to the weight of 40 trucks. In Amsterdam, Dutch startup MX3D is printing components for a stainless steel bridge to span a canal, according to Phys.org.

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