Reliable and accurate industrial 3D printing challenges injection moulding processes

elix Printers has launched the Pro 3, L and XL platforms for industrial production applications to meet the changing needs of the industry.

The shift of the manufacturing workflow to incorporate additive manufacturing in many industrial sectors has led 3D printingmanufacturer, Felix Printers, to develop products and features to serve the changing needs of industry, paying careful attention to detail and listening to customers. The Pro 3, L and XL platforms for industrial production applications were launched end 2018. According to Felix Printers, Pro 3 integrates seamlessly into industrial workflows, be it in the office, workshop, laboratory or factory environment. The 3D printer produces optimised print results repeatably. The L and XL platforms are for greatly increased build volumes of up to 144 litres. Pro L is said to be able to build parts of up to 300 x 400 x 400 mm (11.8 x 15.75 x 15.75 in.), while Pro XL has a build chamber of 600 x 400 x 600 mm (23.62 x 15.75 x 23.62 in.), Felix explains.

With Pro 3, L, and XL AM platforms, OEM’s have a reliable, cost-effective, and easy-to-use production technology for short-to-medium volume applications.

According to the company, the larger systems incorporate highly engineered print chambers, which incorporate an enclosed warm zone and a cold zone, to ensure quality and reliability. The warm zone supports consistent temperature control during the build, which is particularly important when printing materials with a high shrinkage factor, such as ABS, carbon fiber or nylon. In contrast, the cool zone is where the electronics are housed, which prevent overheating and subsequent machine/build failure.

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Is 3D printing going to replace injection molding?

Carbon-3D-printing-models-MD3D printing and injection molding each have their own benefits and limitations when it comes to making medical device parts, according to experts from PTI Engineered PlasticsCarbonand Protolabs

Medical device parts makers are increasingly turning to 3D printing, but additive manufacturing has yet to reach the tipping point where it could supplant injection molding in medtech parts manufacturing, according to a March 8 experts panel at the AD&M Cleveland show in March.

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