Wärtsilä Marine testing potential of additive manufacturing

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When Wärtsilä Marine Solutions took the decision to utilize additive manufacturing to create a vital component for an inert gas system, initial production prototypes displayed an unexpected characteristic. In this new field, with new potential, DNV GL’s established expertise was on hand to help. Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, has the potential to transform the maritime equipment supply chain. With the adoption of technology enabling printing in metal, vital spare parts and system components can now be printed on demand in locations around the world, including on vessels themselves. The result is dramatically reduced lead times, costs, labour needs, stock requirements and environmental impact, as well as the complete disruption of traditional business models.

And that’s just the supply side. The impact on manufacturing capability is just as radical. Suddenly the constraints of traditional processes can be broken, with machines bringing previously impossible designs to life through the precise application of layer upon layer of metals. For the frontrunners in maritime manufacturing, such as Wärtsilä Moss AS, it represents a special kind of magic.

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NAVSEA approves first metal 3D printed shipboard component for US Navy

The U.S. Navy’s Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) has approved the first 3D printed part, a prototype drain strainer orifice (DSO) assembly, for shipboard installation.

The 3D printed prototype drain strainer orifice (DSO) assembly component. Photo via NAVSEA.

“This install marks a significant advancement in the Navy’s ability to make parts on demand and combine NAVSEA’s strategic goal of on-time delivery of ships and submarines while maintaining a culture of affordability,” said Rear Admiral Lorin Selby, NAVSEA Chief Engineer and Deputy Commander for Ship Design, Integration, and Naval Engineering.

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Huntington Ingalls moves to accelerate 3D printing in naval shipbuilding

Chuck Hull, Kevin McAlea and Charles Southall discuss how Newport News Shipbuilding plans to use additive manufacturing technology to produce parts for future warships. Hull is the inventor of stereolithography and co-founder of 3D Systems; McAlea is 3D Systems' executive vice president and general manager, metals and healthcare; Southall is Newport News' vice president of engineering and design.

Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) reports that its Newport News Shipbuilding division has partnered with 3D Systems Corporation (NYSE: DDD) to develop additive manufacturing technologies expected to accelerate the adoption of metal 3-D printing in naval shipbuilding.

The joint effort is expected to support future qualification and certification programs necessary to implement this advanced manufacturing technology for the U.S. Navy and further revolutionize how shipbuilders build the next generation of warships. It is also part of a significant technological transformation underway at Newport News called integrated Digital Shipbuilding (iDS).

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Interview: Maritime 3D printing with RAMLAB and SEMBCORP Marine

Simon Kuik from Sembcorp Marine. Photo: RENDY ARYANTO/Visual Verve Studios.3D printing for the maritime and energy industries is the focus of NAMIC’s 5th additive manufacturing summit later this month.

Taking place in Singapore, the Maritime and Energy AM Summit is organized by the country’s National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Cluster (NAMIC), an organization focused on developing a collaborative and innovative ecosystem for additive manufacturing.

At the event 3D printing experts will gather to discuss operationalising AM, how 3D printing is revolutionising the energy industry, the future of advanced manufacturing and other related topics.

I caught up with two of the experts presenting work at the NAMIC AM summit to learn more.

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Mapping a path to 3D printing marine and offshore parts

Mapping a path to 3D printing marine and offshore partsAdditive Manufacturing (AM) is emerging as a preferred term for what most us call 3D printing. Be that as it may, using the deposition of material to build up a part, rather than machining material away — could soon be used to rapidly make large parts for the marine and offshore industry.

LR (Lloyd’s Register) recently held a qualification workshop for Keppel Marine and Offshore and the Singapore Centre for 3D Printing at Nanyang Technological University to map out a safe, sustainable and quality-driven approach to additive manufacturing (AM) of metallic parts intended for rugged environments, such as shipping and offshore oil and gas production.

Qualification is a critical step towards certification and adoption of industrial products made by AM. The workshop focused on a broad range of knowledge and skills required to demonstrate competency in AM and to meet industry quality and safety regulations and standards.

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