Tag Archives: Supply chain model

FedEx launches 3D printing inventory and repair company Forward Depots

FedEx and 3D printing venture has been expected for some time.

From 3D printed drone-delivery, to on-demand bureau services, postage and shipping companies are investing in the future of additive manufacturing.

In the latest news from the logistics sector, FedEx has announced that it will be launching a new, 3D printing oriented, company under the name FedEx Forward Depots.

The company is the product of a company-wide structural realignment, dedicated to “customized,” “convenient,” and “intuitive” services.

Van, truck, plane, or 3D printing? Fedex is committed to customer deliveries. Image via FedEx

Van, truck, plane, or 3D printing? Fedex is committed to customer deliveries. Image via FedEx

FedEx and 3D printing

When UPS started offering on demand 3D printing services in 2013, many predicted that FedEx would be quick to follow. A case study from 2014, featuring 3D printed medical implant manufacturer Stryker, in fact shows that FedEx has been paying keen attention to 3D printing, and the idea of “Going local” with manufacturing.

“Currently, some medical device companies are delivering 3D printed implants manufactured around the world to hospitals within 24 hours,” reads the company case study.

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3D Printing set to revolutionize mainstream manufacturing

According to Gartner, 3D printing has great potential. Total spending is predicted to grow at a 66.5% CAGR to $17.7 billion in 2020 with over 6.5 million printer sales. Gartner also predicts that “by 2020, 75% of manufacturing operations worldwide will use 3D-printed tools, jigs and fixtures made in-house or by a service bureau to produce finished goods. Also, 3D printing will reduce new product introduction timelines by 25%.” Enterprise 3D printer shipments is also expected to grow 57.4% CAGR through 2020.

The top priorities related to 3D printing include accelerated product development, offering customized products and limited series and increasing production flexibility. Here are additional 3D printing market forecasts:

  • 57% of all 3D printing work done is in the first phases of the new product development
  • 55% companies predict they will be spending more in 3D printing services and solutions in 2017
  • 47% of companies surveyed have seen a greater ROI on their 3D printing investments in 2017 compared to 2016

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3D Printing: The next great supply chain tool

Another tool in the supply chain toolbox, on-demand additive manufacturing promises lower inventories and costs, plus less waste.

adidas futurecraft 4d release date 5 5a09da816feb0The inability to perfectly correlate demand with supply has been a key riddle for supply chains and logistics throughout history. Too much product is a glut. Too little is a scarcity.

Striking a balance is hard, so suppliers use sophisticated algorithms to take their best shot at how much of their products will be needed at a certain time and a certain place to meet an uncertain demand.  Couple that with the need to produce products in large quantities to achieve economies of scale and the issue is exacerbated.

To deal with this, suppliers produce products in large quantities in low labor cost countries, ship and store those products near their customers, hoping that their demand projections turn out to be accurate. This projection is always imperfect, especially considering that the value of inventory in the United States alone was $1.8 trillion in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce. Assuming an inventory carrying cost of 25 percent, that’s $450 million U.S. companies pay each year to hold that inventory.

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How an autonomous vehicle maker slashed the supply chain with 3D printing

The Local Motors Self-driving Olli bus. Photo by Michael Petch3D printing is gaining wider use in the automotive sector. A new case study shows how Local Motors, an autonomous and open source vehicle manufacturer, is using 3D printing to save time and money.

The Phoenix, Arizona based company has a stated focus on low-volume manufacturing, and operates using micro-factories.

Producing vehicles on demand presents a number of unique challenges, including logistics issues such as handling inventory and supply chain management. Suitable solutions may not always be available off-the-shelf.

Local Motors and their “Olli” driverless shuttle project while no longer solely a prototype is not aiming for mass-production stage either. The case study produced by U.S. desktop 3D printer manufacturer, MakerBot, shows how 3D printing forms an essential part of Local Motors’ workflow – and specifically shows one of the key advantages of 3D printing.

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Simplify your manufacturing supply chain with 3D printing

A specialist monitoring a 3D printing machine at 3D printing service company Fast Radius. Photo: UPSWith its capability and widespread use, 3D printing has evolved from being a novelty to becoming an integral part of the manufacturing process. Whether you’re developing a prototype, or seeking to create an on-demand, customizable product, it’s time for businesses to consider the technology.

The 3D printing market is projected to grow from US$5.2 billion in 2015 to US$26.5 billion in 2021. Even if 3D printing penetrates only 5 percent of the global manufacturing economy, research by Wohlers Report estimates that it would reach US$640 billion annually.

Globally, 70 percent of businesses are getting hands-on experience with 3D printing. Asia-Pacific accounts for only 27 percent, indicating an ample amount of room for improvement to expand the 3D printing industry in the region.

Greater China as well as both emerging and mature markets in the Asia Pacific region are expected to experience a combination of large 3D printer shipments and high growth rates through 2020.

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Using 3D printing to improve Mining uptime and productivity

3D printing, digital era3D printing may have burst onto the scene a few years ago with much hype, but it hasn’t yet revolutionised industrial sectors as some analysts exuberantly predicted.

However, forward-thinking Mining organisations are realising that industrial-scale 3D printing in the mines could skim costs from their operations and reduce the frustrations of equipment downtime. By 3D printing the spare parts and replaceable components that complex mine machinery requires, Mine Operators can gain greater control over the supply chain and ensure smooth running of the mine’s equipment.

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Can 3D printing address higher volume manufacturing needs?

At the RAPID & TCT Show that took place in Pittsburgh in May, Stratasys took a significant step into higher volume, continuous production additive technology when it unveiled it’s expandable, rack-like ‘Continuous Build 3D Demonstrator’. As the name implies, the unit is not ready to be sold as yet, but it is being trialled by select customers and Stratasys believes it represents a key shift towards realising 3D printing for the mass market.

The platform is composed of a modular unit with multiple print cells working simultaneously and set out like racks in a data centre. It is driven by central, cloud-based architecture that is designed to produce parts in a continuous stream with only minor operator intervention, automatically ejecting completed parts and commencing the build of new ones.

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New 3D printing technologies look to support mass production

Adidas to Use New Technology to Produce 1 Million Soles, While There Could be a Be a Breakthrough in Metals Printing

So called 3D printing, also sometimes referred to as “additive manufacturing,” appears ready for prime time in many areas, such as at GE’s aircraft division, which plans on using the technology in a big way for its upcoming its Advanced Turboprop (ATP) engine, which will power the all-new Cessna Denali aircraft.

Additive parts will cut that engine’s weight by 5%, the company says. (See GE Makes Major Strides in 3D Printing, as Advances in Metals-Based Composition Opens Up Many New Applications.)

But the rap is that 3D printed parts are too slow and expensive to be used for making things in mass quantities – it can take two days to create just one a complex object in some cases, for example. Therefore, the 3D focus has been on things like parts, certain medical devices, or custom dental crowns that are produced in small batches or even just one of a given specification.

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3D Printing – One of five keys trends to look out for in Middle East retail logistics

With the perpetual advancement of technology, retail logistics is undergoing rapid change. What used to be complex is now being blended with technology to create more efficient, self-orchestrated systems. The rapid change affecting the sector can be broken down into five key trends that will impact local retailers supply chains in the coming years.

3D Printing

Additive manufacturing or 3D printing shifts the value in manufacturing from the company that owns the inventory or equipment to the company that owns the intellectual property. Customers with 3D printing capabilities will simply download patterns and create their own parts on site.

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Disruptive technology poised to transform manufacturing

“3D printing – a technology that builds products layer by layer rather than milling or forming them from metal or plastic – is beginning to earn its place in everyday use at some of the world’s largest manufacturers. As the technology becomes more powerful and less expensive, the potential to locate small factories everywhere for everything from automobiles to fashion, even for a market of one, becomes a distinct possibility.”

Two important milestones in the long march toward a three- dimensional printing revolution were achieved in late 2012 with little or no fanfare. First, General Electric announced that it had purchased a small precision-engineering firm called Morris Technologies, based near Cincinnati, Ohio (USA), and planned to use the company’s 3D printing machines to make parts for jet engines. Then The Economist disclosed that researchers at EADS, the European aerospace group best known for building Airbus aircraft, were using 3D printers to make a titanium landing-gear bracket and planned to “print” the entire wing of an airliner. Both companies cited the fact that it is far more economical to build titanium parts one layer at a time than to carve them out of a solid block of the expensive metal, generating significant waste material.

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